There are 1.2 million-galaxies in this 3-D map of the Space

It took hundreds of physicists and astronomers 5 years to build this image, which is the largest-ever, the majority precise,3-dimensional map of far-away galaxies that charts the dark energy propelling the accelerated growth of the Universe.
Project co-leader Jeremy Tinker from New York University said: "We have exhausted five years collecting measurements of 1.2 million galaxies over one district of the sky to map out the arrangement of the space over a volume of 650 cubic billion light years."
The consequences of the plan have been published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. "This map has allowed us to make the top measurements yet of the property of dark energy in the growth of the Universe. We are creation our results and map available to the world," Tinker adds.
Consistent with the calculations of universal relativity, the galaxies were experiential drifting towards areas of the Universe with extra matter - thus more gravitational pull.
Shirley Ho, an astrophysicist at Berkeley Lab & Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) who co-led 2 of the friend papers says the data they gathered will pave the way towards extra accurate measurements: "We can now measure how a great deal the galaxies and stars cluster jointly as a function of time to such an accuracy we can test General Relativity at cosmological scales," she supposed.
The results of the plan have been published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. "This map has allowable us to make the top measurements yet of the property of dark energy in the expansion of the Universe. We are creation our results and map obtainable to the world," Tinker adds.
Consistent with the calculations of universal relativity, the galaxies were observed traveling towards areas of the Universe with additional matter - thus extra gravitational pull.
Shirley Ho, an astrophysicist at Berkeley Lab and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) who co-led two of the friend papers says the data they gathered will pave the way towards more precise measurements: "We can currently measure how a great deal the galaxies and stars cluster jointly as a function of time to such an accuracy we can check General RelatFrom that point on, astronomers were able to watch the competition between dark stuff and dark energy in controlling the Universe’s growth.
"We’ve made the main map for studying the 95 percent of the cosmos that is dark," said David Schlegel, astrophysicist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and principal researcher for BOSS.
"In this map, we can see galaxies organism gravitationally pulled towards other galaxies by dark substance. And on much better scales, we see the result of dark energy ripping the Universe apart."
Rita Tojeiro of the University of St Andrews in Scotland, who co-led the BOSS galaxy cluster working collection alongside Tinker outlines how this is a milestone for cosmology:
    "We see a dramatic link between the sound wave track seen in the cosmic microwave background 400,000 years after the Big Bang to the cluster of galaxies 7-12 billion years later. The ability to watch a single well-modelled physical effect from recombination awaiting today is a great boon for cosmology."
"The results from BOSS provide a solid basis for even more precise future BAO capacity, such as those we expect from the Dark Energy Spectroscopic gadget (DESI)," said Natalie Roe, Physics Division director at Berkeley Lab.
"DESI will construct a extra detailed three-dimensional map in a volume of space ten times bigger to precisely characterise dark energy — and in the finish the future of our Universe."ivity at cosmological scales," she said.
There are 1.2 million-galaxies in this 3-D map of the Space

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